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AA: Like any armchair football coach, the armchair politician’s task is always the easiest; it becomes a different story when the reality hits him in office. What is your take on that?

Related: Exclusive Interview: Marricke Kofi Gane Talks Political Future and More - Part 3

Marricke Kofi Gane is a chartered accountant by profession, a corporate coach, and an International Development expert, with experience managing several aid funds for European governments in over 30 countries.

Well, let me put it this way – it is not enough if I wish to stand – the people must also want me to stand, after all, they will be the ones to vote for me. What I can say however is this - if I do make an announcement to stand in 2020, it will be because the people believe in me. Do I believe I am ready myself?

Exclusive Interview: Marricke Kofi Gane Talks Political Future and More – Part 2

Marricke Kofi Gane is a chartered accountant by profession, a corporate coach, and an International Development expert, with experience managing several aid funds for European governments in over 30 countries.

I am not sure there is a very new me from when we last spoke. I think it’s more the case that the Author side of me has been asked to proceed on leave, hahaha, and my more vocal and politically inclined self, awakened. Both have always been there.

Exclusive Interview: Marricke Kofi Gane Talks Political Future and More - Part 1

Marricke Kofi Gane (MKG) is a chartered accountant by profession, a corporate coach, and an International Development expert, with experience managing several aid funds for European governments in over 30 countries.

There has been much debate about democratic dysfunction in the advanced world due to paralyzing polarization exacerbated by fake news and social media manipulation. Isn’t this also an issue in the fledgling democracies of the developing world, from Malaysia to Kenya, Nigeria and elsewhere?

The developing world is an easy target for populists – Kofi Annan

Kofi Annan was secretary-general of the United Nations from 1997 to 2006 and is a co-recipient with the U.N. of the 2001 Nobel Peace Prize. He sat down with The WorldPost editor-in-chief Nathan Gardels for an interview, which has been condensed and edited for clarity. This interview originally appeared in the Washington Post on 10 May 2018.

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